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Archive for Bath Design

Nov 20 2014

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Tile 101: Study Up Before Specifying

Color body porcelain tile

When it comes to specifying tile for the first time, you quickly come to realize there is a lot more to tile than just squares, rectangles and neutral whites. Tiles these days come in a variety of shapes, sizes, colors and materials from small glass mosaics, to large-format, wood-look planks. Beyond just finding a collection that matches your design inspiration visually, there are a few terms you are likely to come across when it gets down to the nitty-gritty of specification. Here is a quick guide to help you read between the (grout) lines:

Through Body Porcelain vs. Color Body Porcelain

Through body porcelain (sometimes referred to as unglazed porcelain) tiles are produced using colored raw materials that permeate the entire tile, incorporating uninterrupted color and pattern features seen on the surface all the way through the tile body. The surface design is evident in a cross-section of the tile body, providing outstanding abrasion resistance and durability.

Color body porcelain tiles (above) are created with continuous colored stains from the glaze surface throughout the body of the tile. Synchronizing the color of both the glaze and body lessens the visibility of any impact chips that may occur. The color remains consistent throughout the tile, but any surface design does not continue through the tile body.

Through body porcelain tile

Through body porcelain tile

Wall Tile vs. Floor Tile

Generally speaking, any tile designated by the manufacturer as floor tile can be installed on vertical surfaces and countertops. The reverse is not true, however. Wall tile is not suitable for use on floors. It is usually non-vitreous, i.e., not manufactured to withstand excessive impact, abrasion or freeze/thaw cycling.

One caveat when considering floor tile for wall or countertop installation is the abrasiveness of the tile. A highly abrasive product would be more difficult to clean on a wall or countertop since commercial floor scrubbers could not realistically be used for maintenance. Otherwise, continuing the chosen floor tile on walls adds great cohesion to an installation and continuity of design flow.

Rectified Tile

A tile that has been “rectified” has had all its edges mechanically finished to achieve a more precise facial dimension. This allows for installation of tile with very narrow grout joints, creating a more seamless look across walls and floors. Thanks to rectified edges permitting minimal grout lines, the latest large-format, wood-look porcelain planks are even more difficult to decipher from natural wood. If your tiles are larger than 15 inches, however, there are certain precautions to take when installing, and it is recommended that you consult a contractor experienced in large tile installations for a sure fit.

Rectified tile

Rectified tile

Shade & Caliber

A tile’s shade (dye lot) refers to the coloration and reflectivity of a tile. A tile’s caliber refers to its facial dimension (size) and is measured with a tool called a caliper (often the terms are confused). Since natural materials are used in both the body and glazes of the tile, slight variations in shade and caliber are normally inherent from one production run to the next. Typically, tile shades (dye lots) are indicated by either an alpha/numeric combination or a three- or four-digit numeral (A16, 3408, 250, etc.), while caliber sizes are normally shown as 07, 08, 09, 00, 01, 02, etc.

It is important to purchase tile that has the same shade (dye lot) and caliber, if at all possible, to ensure a pleasing aesthetic appearance as well as consistent grout joints. This is especially important for larger tiles. Normally, two adjacent calibers (i.e. 07 with 08 or 08 with 09 – not 07 with 09) can be used in an installation if the installer is aware of the variation before the installation is begun because the slight difference can be adjusted within the grout joint.

Even with these terms under your belt, don’t hesitate to ask questions when working with a tile dealer or distributor – they may have ideas for unique applications you never imagined possible.

- By Marianne Cox, Marketing Manager for Marazzi USA

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Nov 12 2014

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Before and After Bathroom

Frank-Clark-bathroom-1-copy

Pamela Wilmoth, ASID, renovated this master bathroom in a 1920s cottage-style house in Oregon that was designed by local architect Frank Clark.

The client’s goals were to: 

- Improve the storage opportunities
- Update the overall design but retain some ambiance of the home’s original style
- Install a larger shower and a claw-foot tub
- Improve the dim lighting

Before 6

Wilmoth and her team provided the following solutions:

- They discovered a hidden space under the eaves that was used to enlarge the shower and include the tub.
- She refurbished the overhead chandelier, which was period-dated to the house, and used vintage sconces on either side of an antique mirror over the sink.
- She updated the pink/brown color scheme with a light blue hue from Benjamin Moore’s Historic Colors Collection on the ceiling and walls to complement the white marble.
- They reclaimed and adapted a serpentine-front dresser for the sink and added a marble top with a marble backsplash.

Frank-Clark-bathroom-2-copy

Challenges

Wilmoth and her team learned that the tub on the second floor, which was tucked under the eaves of the original structure, was leaking, and there was very little storage available.

“There was a potential space behind it in an unused hall closet, but the slanted walls met the ceiling there at just 5 feet high,” she said. “We ended up rearranging the footprint by opening up the side walls and ceiling to take advantage of the angled planes created by the deep-pitched roof line.”

Before 3

Another challenge was where to find the room to include a separate shower and a claw-foot tub.

“A light went on during discussions with the plumber when we thought to put the tub in the shower space,” said Wilmoth. “An added benefit was that we were able to use the existing drain pipes without having to use costly additions.”

The tub was eventually tucked back under the eave of the shower area, which Wilmoth said left plenty of room to accommodate both.

Sources

Design: Pamela Wilmoth Interior Design; Photography: Gerry Katz

Faucets: Jado & Mico Designs; Showerhead & Valve: Delta; Sink & Toilet: Kohler; Tub: Victoria + Albert

Bathroom-Floorplan-before-after copy

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Oct 30 2014

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Bathroom Update Wins Award

www.andreahanksphotography.com

Nate Coombs and his team won the DreamMaker Bath and Kitchen’s Franchisee of the Year award for the redesign of an outdated master suite. The owners wanted a modern, elegant look without using too much tile.

The homeowner wasn’t happy with the following:

-       White tile

-       Gold (polished brass) fixtures

-       Empty wall between the vanity and tub deck

-       Inadequate storage space

-       Floor tile that did not flow from the vanity/tub room into the shower, toilet room and closet

-       Too much grout on the tub deck and shower tile

-       Small, enclosed shower with too much glass and a metal frame (below)

Before

Improvements included:

-       Installed stone-simulated porcelain floor tile in warm, earth tones that flows into all spaces

-       Modified the tub deck and updated it with marble slabs with no grout lines and a stone/glass mosaic splash (below)

www.andreahanksphotography.com

-       Added cabinetry – painted white maple – for more storage and a new makeup area

-       Installed marble vanity tops

-       Updated plumbing fixtures

-       Enlarged the shower so it is now a walk-in with light marble slabs, a glass/stone mosaic and a frameless piece of glass to allow light in (below)

www.andreahanksphotography.com

Sources
Cabinets: Wellborn Cabinetry
Countertop: Emperadora Dark by Bedrock Quartz
Glass/Stone Mosaics: Daltile
Hardware: Jeffery Alexander
Lighting: Kichler
Marble Sheets on Tub Deck and in Shower: ForzaStone
Photographer: Andrea Hanks Photography
Plumbing Fixtures: Moen
Tile: Unicom Starker
Toilet: Gerber

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Oct 15 2014

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Designers Discuss Favorite Trends & Products

October is National Kitchen and Bath Month, and we thought it would be interesting to ask designers what they thought were some of the most significant trends and products in kitchen and bath design today.

Outdoor Living Environments on the Rise

“There is growing interest in bringing the comfort and hominess we love indoors outside,” said Grace Kelly of Kitchen Designs. “At Kitchen Designs we are also noticing a major upswing in demand for creating outdoor environments, especially outdoor kitchens.” When you specify for the outdoors, it’s important to consider quality components that can withstand the elements.

The Kalamazoo Outdoor Gourmet and BLANCO kitchen sink and faucet are featured in this outdoor installation by Kitchen Designs.

The Kalamazoo Outdoor Gourmet and BLANCO kitchen sink and faucet are featured in this outdoor installation by Kitchen Designs.

Timeless Elements Inspire a Sense of Permanence

“In new construction, there is a movement toward traditional kitchens, with an emphasis on quality that inspires a sense of permanence,” said Drew Lang of Lang Architecture, designer and developer of Hudson Woods. “Today’s homebuyer – whether it’s their first, second or third purchase – doesn’t want a trendy kitchen that will need a refresh in five years; they are looking for timelessness, and Hudson Woods evokes precisely that sentiment. Our kitchens are built to last with handcrafted finishes and cutting-edge accouterments.”

Hudson Woods architect Drew Lang sought a timeless look with SMEG appliances.

Hudson Woods architect Drew Lang sought a timeless look with SMEG appliances.

Blending Traditional and Modern Elements

Many clients are looking for the comfort of classic styles but at the same time seek to be fresh and contemporary. “I look for something ‘different’ that has not been over used and is on trend yet [with a] classic style,” said Cheryl Kees Clendenon of In Detail Design. “Just the right blend of traditional and modern.”

Tile of Spain manufacturer Porcelanosa offers just right blend of traditional and modern for this In Detail Design bathroom.

Tile of Spain manufacturer Porcelanosa offers just right blend of traditional and modern for this In Detail Design bathroom.

Another tactic to blend old and new: Use contemporary finishes with traditional hardware patterns by Top Knobs as featured in this In Detail Design kitchen.

Another tactic to blend old and new: Use contemporary finishes with traditional hardware patterns by Top Knobs as featured in this In Detail Design kitchen.

Layered Conversations – Designing for Multi-Uses

”Kitchens these days are all about a layered conversation,” said Christopher D. Martinez, Poggenpohl Paramus, N.J. “How are all the individual pieces working together as a whole for the end user and their guests? The kitchen should communicate both functionally & aesthetically.”

Clients want spaces for storage, cooking and entertaining. Defining workspaces for each, homeowners can prepare meals and remain part of the conversation with guests and family.

Defining workspaces helps homeowners to prepare meals and remain part of the conversation for this Poggenpohl kitchen.

Defining workspaces helps homeowners to prepare meals and remain part of the conversation for this Poggenpohl kitchen.

Baths Are a Calming Getaway from the Stress of Daily Life

Michael Adams recently designed a bathroom space for the Ronald McDonald House of Long Island. While he was designing for the many families in crisis who will be using the space, the need for a calming getaway from the stress of daily life is certainly a trend today in everyday bathroom design.

“I wanted to create a contemporary space that was serene and calm for the families who are staying there,” said Adams of Michael Adams ID. “Kartell by Laufen offered me the look and the functionality for this space where so many families just need a clean environment and a pampering break where all their needs are met in this time of crisis. The fixtures are pure, simple and highly designed. They rise up to meet the need while maintaining the clutter free and calming space I was hoping for.”

The need for a calming getaway from the stress of daily life is certainly a trend today in everyday bathroom design, according to Michael Adams of Michael Adams ID.

The need for a calming getaway from the stress of daily life is certainly a trend today in everyday bathroom design, according to Michael Adams of Michael Adams ID.

 

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