K+BB Collective | The Designers' Corner

Archive for Trends

Jan 26 2015

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NAHB New American Home Makes Statement during Design & Construction Week

Main photo The New American Home, now in its 30th year, is the NAHB show house that exhibits the latest and greatest new home trends and technologies. This year’s home, constructed by Blue Herron Builders, was no exception. It sits in the hills of the desert, outside of Las Vegas, and is a contemporary with warmth and style. The simplicity of the architecture and furnishings are juxtaposed with rich textures and organic color palettes that enhance the stunning desert view. The Entry The entry, an outdoor space with water features, serves also as a casual entertaining space with simple seating, a glass-top table – complete with both fire and water features and one of the home’s 19 televisions. Yes, 19 televisions! It may seem excessive, but apparently, as a society, we have a growing desire to stay connected. As a designer who specializes in kitchen-centric living, I was happy to see an open floor plan in the kitchen. The stylish space also displayed a current trend: no wall cabinets. Tall units, open shelving and a hidden walk-in pantry create ample storage and a clutter-free, streamlined look. Kitchen 1 The Bosch appliances included a sleek, side-swing wall oven (which I voted for in a trade innovative products contest last year and find to be brilliance!) and other integrated appliances in a design in which I would love to cook. Two islands separated the kitchen cooking wall from the great space. The first, a prep island with a Kohler undercount sink, and the second, a stunning Caesarstone counter attached to the wall allowing for a casual meal, gathering of friends or a kids’ homework station. Bosch oven Very versatile, multifunction open space is my favorite type of home floor plan for family fun and entertaining. What I like to call the “great space” (because it is much more than just a “room”) featured ample and comfortable seating, stunning views, a fabulous chandelier and a beautiful gas fireplace, as well as another of the home’s 19 televisions. Great space A hallway to the media room has a textural wall of marble mosaic and another stunning gas fireplace with gemstones covering the flame jets. The media room houses one of the home’s several bars. Another bar in a loft space upstairs from what I called the “great space” continued the vibe of the entertainment, home-party lifestyle as the bar layout had a pub feel. It seems that wine enthusiasm is on the rise, especially as a trend for home entertaining. The lounging space by the bar features not only another TV, comfy lounge seating and a pool table but also a killer glass wine room that captures the trending wine culture in a strong way. Wine wall The master suite follows the trend of well-organized, walk-in closets and less clumsy storage furniture. Behind the comfy bed is a stadium-style seating area for relaxation. The ensuite bath features simple white fixtures, as well as a trending freestanding tub and floating vanities for both him and her. The guest suites and other outdoor living spaces keep with the simple and uncluttered trends. Bedroom Floating vanities The technical aspects of the home are pretty impressive, as well. The energy the home needs to operate is actually produced on site, and many new building technologies are utilized to make the home incredibly energy efficient. Roof end Personally, I am happy to see the continuing interior trends of user-friendly, uncluttered, chic space that is still warm. The floor plan, furnishings, textural elements and lighting truly give an inviting feel. I found The New American Home to be very inspiring even though my market is the New York metro area. More information on the home, it’s impressive HERS rating of -13 and all the other specs and tech information can be found at www.tnah.com.

- Toni Sabatino, NKBA Manhattan Chapter

 

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Oct 15 2014

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Designers Discuss Favorite Trends & Products

October is National Kitchen and Bath Month, and we thought it would be interesting to ask designers what they thought were some of the most significant trends and products in kitchen and bath design today.

Outdoor Living Environments on the Rise

“There is growing interest in bringing the comfort and hominess we love indoors outside,” said Grace Kelly of Kitchen Designs. “At Kitchen Designs we are also noticing a major upswing in demand for creating outdoor environments, especially outdoor kitchens.” When you specify for the outdoors, it’s important to consider quality components that can withstand the elements.

The Kalamazoo Outdoor Gourmet and BLANCO kitchen sink and faucet are featured in this outdoor installation by Kitchen Designs.

The Kalamazoo Outdoor Gourmet and BLANCO kitchen sink and faucet are featured in this outdoor installation by Kitchen Designs.

Timeless Elements Inspire a Sense of Permanence

“In new construction, there is a movement toward traditional kitchens, with an emphasis on quality that inspires a sense of permanence,” said Drew Lang of Lang Architecture, designer and developer of Hudson Woods. “Today’s homebuyer – whether it’s their first, second or third purchase – doesn’t want a trendy kitchen that will need a refresh in five years; they are looking for timelessness, and Hudson Woods evokes precisely that sentiment. Our kitchens are built to last with handcrafted finishes and cutting-edge accouterments.”

Hudson Woods architect Drew Lang sought a timeless look with SMEG appliances.

Hudson Woods architect Drew Lang sought a timeless look with SMEG appliances.

Blending Traditional and Modern Elements

Many clients are looking for the comfort of classic styles but at the same time seek to be fresh and contemporary. “I look for something ‘different’ that has not been over used and is on trend yet [with a] classic style,” said Cheryl Kees Clendenon of In Detail Design. “Just the right blend of traditional and modern.”

Tile of Spain manufacturer Porcelanosa offers just right blend of traditional and modern for this In Detail Design bathroom.

Tile of Spain manufacturer Porcelanosa offers just right blend of traditional and modern for this In Detail Design bathroom.

Another tactic to blend old and new: Use contemporary finishes with traditional hardware patterns by Top Knobs as featured in this In Detail Design kitchen.

Another tactic to blend old and new: Use contemporary finishes with traditional hardware patterns by Top Knobs as featured in this In Detail Design kitchen.

Layered Conversations – Designing for Multi-Uses

”Kitchens these days are all about a layered conversation,” said Christopher D. Martinez, Poggenpohl Paramus, N.J. “How are all the individual pieces working together as a whole for the end user and their guests? The kitchen should communicate both functionally & aesthetically.”

Clients want spaces for storage, cooking and entertaining. Defining workspaces for each, homeowners can prepare meals and remain part of the conversation with guests and family.

Defining workspaces helps homeowners to prepare meals and remain part of the conversation for this Poggenpohl kitchen.

Defining workspaces helps homeowners to prepare meals and remain part of the conversation for this Poggenpohl kitchen.

Baths Are a Calming Getaway from the Stress of Daily Life

Michael Adams recently designed a bathroom space for the Ronald McDonald House of Long Island. While he was designing for the many families in crisis who will be using the space, the need for a calming getaway from the stress of daily life is certainly a trend today in everyday bathroom design.

“I wanted to create a contemporary space that was serene and calm for the families who are staying there,” said Adams of Michael Adams ID. “Kartell by Laufen offered me the look and the functionality for this space where so many families just need a clean environment and a pampering break where all their needs are met in this time of crisis. The fixtures are pure, simple and highly designed. They rise up to meet the need while maintaining the clutter free and calming space I was hoping for.”

The need for a calming getaway from the stress of daily life is certainly a trend today in everyday bathroom design, according to Michael Adams of Michael Adams ID.

The need for a calming getaway from the stress of daily life is certainly a trend today in everyday bathroom design, according to Michael Adams of Michael Adams ID.

 

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Jul 31 2014

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Slimming Down

It’s not just the millennials that are facing kitchens of tiny proportions. Between the struggling economy and the prominent baby boomer population, more and more homeowners are looking at downsizing.

At a press event with General Electric last week, I got to see the newest prototypes in micro-kitchen concepts and what might be next for city apartments and small homes. GE’s six ft., linear piece did not seem at first any more than ordinary until I learned all that was in it.

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Within a standard countertop height and depth and a standard module of 24 inches wide, the concept contains a full kitchen suite. On the left hand side, an induction cooktop sits atop a microwave and an oven, which are hidden behind a walnut cabinet front. The centerpiece, topped with additional counterspace, holds the refrigeration module. The third module on the far right is the cleaning module, complete with a sink, disposer and dishwasher.

Everything could just be crammed in this tiny space, but consumers want to integrate technology and retain the luxury of a full size kitchen. Even if they are downsizing, they are not willing to give up those modern touches they’ve come to love. GE’s micro-kitchen prototype therefore has ventilation integrated into the backsplash, as well as a task light and cutting board on top of the kitchen sink. The touch screen technology on the oven, refrigerator and dishwasher give the user multiple options and increase space with the lack of knobs and buttons.

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What’s next for the micro-kitchen? GE and its FirsBuild online community are exploring ways to customize these concepts and offer different options for whatever the situation. Current ideas include an overhead cabinet as well as the standard countertop height piece, and a kitchen that hides a laundry system too. As available households shrink and people move towards the cities and downsize, micro-kitchens are truly the kitchens of the future. Start thinking small.

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Jul 16 2014

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Helping Clients Identify Their Style

Metropolitan Cabinets & Countertops copy

Many homeowners’ busy lives prevent them from being style-conscious, causing them to use the wrong terminology when referring to their personal taste or claim they are not particular. How can a designer best help these homeowners who may never have given a thought to what they ideally would want in their homes through this overwhelming process?

Here are some tips from some experts:

1. Get visual. Assemble a binder, PowerPoint or PDF you can keep on your desktop or tablet. In it, have images of five different style kitchens, living rooms, bathrooms, accessories and maybe pieces of furniture as a conversation-starter exercise.

“If someone seems to have little opinion, I will show them two choices and ask, ‘Which do you like better?’” said Kate Brady, manager of showroom operations for General Plumbing Supply in Walnut Creek, Calif., and president of the Decorative Plumbing & Hardware Association. “People have trouble making choices when offered more than two options at a time, so keeping it simple works. Doing that four to five times gives me a good idea of what direction they are going. It is a simple method that always works.”

2. Give them homework. Alternatively, you could ask your client to bring along blueprints, sketches and their “Idea Book.” “The idea book is usually made up of pages torn from a magazine or a print-out from one of the online social media design sites like Houzz,” said John Murphy of Redlon & Johnson, a leading New England wholesale distributor of plumbing products, and president of the National Association of Plumbing Showroom Professionals. “Their taste can be made clear by pointing out what they like in the picture and, of equal importance, what they don’t like.

3. Look for clues. Observe details such as whether the individual is right-handed or left-handed and what colors they are wearing. “Clients wear colors that they like and are partial to,” said Murphy. “Do not be surprised as the client leaves if they have chosen paint, tile, fabrics and fixtures that will match the clothing they are wearing when they visit your showroom. And physical observance of motor skills can impact everything from the location of faucet handles in the kitchen to flush handles on toilets or hand-held showers in the bathroom.”

Transitional Style Gaining Speed

”Transitional is a style that appeals to both younger and older consumers,” said Brady. “We’ve moved away from a highly decorative style and gold finishes that were popular before 2008 toward a design style that is plain, simple and easy to maintain. Consumers want to create spaces that are more flexible and will have a longer life. That’s what’s fashionable now. Generally speaking, younger consumers favor a more modern design, and older consumers favor more traditional design, but transitional design tends to appeal to both.”

Brady has noticed geographic differences in design preferences as well. “I worked in Florida from 2004-2008, and the East Coast tends to skew more modern or contemporary,” she said. “The community I work in now tends to be more traditional, but not far away in Napa you’ll find more fans of contemporary design, so I guess the best advice I could give someone in terms of identifying their client’s style is to treat them like an individual, not a stereotype.”

Murphy agrees. “It’s a challenge to identify someone’s personal design style,” he said. “The same client who owns more than one home may even have several different styles depending on where those homes are located,” he added, noting the same regional differences on which Brady commented. “Someone living in Santa Fe is going to have a different approach to personal design than someone living in Boston.

“Along the coastline from Maine to the mid-Atlantic, you’ll find the cottage style is more popular. It’s less formal, less ornate. It favors brushed finishes vs. polished. It’s more conservative and less stylized,” said Murphy. “In more metropolitan areas like Manhattan, Chicago, Minneapolis and Los Angeles, the contemporary style is more popular. It’s very current and sophisticated.”

“When it comes to the kitchen, consumers want choices that complement their main faucet,” said Jack Backstrom, director of global water products planning for InSinkErator. “Their preferences regarding the size of their water dispenser, for instance, depend on the size of their traditional tap. Generally speaking, consumers want their water dispenser to be understated…they don’t want it competing or contrasting with their main faucet.”

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