K+BB Collective | The Designers' Corner

Archive for Kitchen Design

Nov 20 2017

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A Showhouse for a Cause

The proceeds from this year’s Atlanta Homes & Lifestyles Home for the Holidays Designer Showhouse are going to Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta. The 8,800-sq.-ft. home, which is open to the public Thursdays through Sundays until Dec. 10, showcases the work of 20 of Atlanta’s top designers. It was built by Sheehan Built Homes and was designed by architectural firm Harrison Design. The cabinets throughout the home were designed by Bell Cabinetry & Design. Photo above by David Christensen

The kitchen, which features shades of white, gray and black, was designed by Meredith McBrearty of Meredith McBrearty Interiors. The quartzite countertops are from Levantina. Photo by David Christensen

A mudroom off the laundry space provides a seating area to take off shoes when entering the house. Plenty of storage was incorporated into this project, which was designed by Lauren Davenport Imber of Davenport Designs Ltd.

A bar off the living space designed by Robert Brown of Robert Brown Interior Design features a countertop in Striato Onyx by Levantina. Gold fixtures and hardware complement the rich, brown cabinetry. Photo by David Christensen

This enclosed shower area designed by Alice Cramer of Alice Cramer Interiors features a cotton white bench and curb in LG Viatera quartz.

The second-floor master bath designed by Patricia McLean of Patricia McClean Interiors features his-and-hers vanities, a tub from MTI Baths and LV Viatera quartz countertops.

The children’s bathroom designed by Mallory Mathison Glenn and Elizabeth Graves features a bold blue paint with splashes of red detail and a quartz countertop.

A freestanding soaking tub from MTI Baths takes center stage in the master bath on the home’s main floor, which was designed by Cathy Rhodes of Cathy Rhodes Interiors.

The ground floor powder room – our favorite room in the house – features marble countertops, DXV plumbing fixtures and whimsical wallpaper. The space was designed by Clary Bosbyshell of Margaux Interiors Limited. Photo by David Christensen

Oct 30 2017

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Art of the Table


After everything has been installed and all of the furnishings are in place, a beautifully set table is the final touch in a renovation. One recent event in New York City honored this form of art.

Bilotta Kitchens and Replacements, Ltd., in association with media sponsor Traditional Home, hosted the seventh-annual “Art of the Table.” The event featured five New York City-based interior designers and the five distinctive vignettes they designed at the Bilotta Kitchens showroom in New York City.

The participating designers for this event were Rajni Alex of Rajni Alex Design; Rayman Boozer of Apartment 48; Jennifer Flanders of Jennifer Flanders Inc.; Julie Schuster of Julie Schuster Design Studio; and Asler Valero of Asler Valero Interior Design. We spoke with each of them to find out more about their table settings.

“I tried to use the gardens of Versailles as inspiration to enhance a modern kitchen and create a colorful and convivial atmosphere. I loved the opportunity to mix old with new.”

– Rayman Boozer of Apartment 48



“My goal was to create a space that feels inviting and warm – a place where you would want to spend time with family and friends. I was not going for a completely polished look. Rather, I was trying to convey the idea of ‘getting ready’ to have people over in a very real way – setting out all the dishes in piles, organizing the silverware, cutting the flowers, baking cookies – all to prepare the house for guests.”

– Jennifer Flanders of Jennifer Flanders Inc.

“I used organic materials like dry lentils, stones from the Mediterranean Sea, bay leaves, corn husks and the table cloth fabric, ‘IMERA’ by ELITIS, which is made out of jute. I wanted to mix the white, sleek kitchen with sophisticated accessories, organic materials and whimsical art, while keeping a balance where each one stands on its own.”

– Asler Valero of Asler Valero Interior Design

“We layered fine china patterns with delicate crystal and sparkling silver from Replacements to set the stage. Beautiful floral arrangements from Starbright Floral Designs are reminiscent of an English garden and add subtle drama to the space. Delectable treats from Chantilly Patisserie, antique books, a bold black-and-white photograph and a beautifully framed print of an English manor from J. Pocker add to the overall ambience and elegance of the space.”

– Rajni Alex of Rajni Alex Design

“I wanted to evoke the amazing, vivid memories we all have of beautiful alfresco dining experiences: a summer evening, when the air absolutely caresses your skin. The scent of ripening grapes or night-blooming florals wafting into the arbor where the table is set to welcome family and good friends. For “Tuscan Garden Party,” I wanted to recreate these favorite alfresco dining memories we all have –when the tinkle of crystal glasses is punctuated with the laughter of friends enjoying one another’s company too much to allow the evening to end.”

– Julie Schuster of Julie Schuster Design Studio

Oct 11 2017

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Design for Everyone

The National Kitchen & Bath Association recently hosted a webinar titled “Top Tips for Implementing Universal Design Strategies” with Dani Polidor, CKD, CBD, owner of Suite Artistry, in Rochester, N.Y. She is NCIDQ and CAPS certified and has been a Design for a Difference ambassador since 2014.

According to cohousing.org, universal design/build presents a shift in the approach to residential design and construction. Comfort and convenience, regardless of age, stature or ability, is the hallmark of inclusive design.

Why Was CAPS Created? 

  • – Americans prefer to remain in their homes as they age rather than to seek assisted living or other arrangements.
  • – Older consumers want a reliable means to identify the professionals they can trust to remodel their homes. Help facilitate the evolution of the home as needs arise.

Polidor identified the seven principles of universal design:

  • – Flexibility in Use
  • – Simple & Intuitive Use
  • – Equitable Use
  • – Tolerance for Error
  • – Perceptible Information
  • – Low Physical Effort
  • – Size and Space for Approach and Use

And she identified the different groups of people who could benefit from universal design:

  • – People with height restrictions
  • – Those who speak different languages
  • – The elderly
  • – Individuals who are disabled
  • – Even those without disabilities

She also shared real-life examples to identify solutions for designing for clients with various needs.

  • Hearing Impaired. Visual, motion and auditory assistive technology
  • Mobility & Accessibility Issues. Ramps, elevators, chair lifts; lever handles and electronic controls; occupancy sensors and rocker switches; drawers and open shelves; lowered cooking surfaces and drawer-style appliances; wall-mounted lavatories and comfort-height toilets; thermostatic or pressure-balanced shower controls; tubs that fir the size, shape and ability of the user; grab bars and benches in showers
  • Sight Impaired/Sensitive. Window films, remote-controlled shades; contrasting floor patterns and colors; large display screens

Sep 04 2017

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When in Amsterdam


As you have seen from our most recent news feature, I spent this past week in Berlin learning about the new Miele appliance. Instead of flying straight home afterward, I took advantage of the long weekend and the location, and I visited an old friend who lives in Amsterdam.


She and her Dutch roommate live just across the street from the Dappermarkt, an open-air market, and in biking distance (because everyone bicycles there) from the city center. As great as the location was though, the greatest part of that flat was the kitchen.

If you’ve ever stayed in a European flat, the typical kitchens are mainly small and lack character or efficiency. Often even the cabinet fronts are missing – people take them when they move – and there is rarely anything other than an oven, a little countertop space, a stove and refrigerator (at least in my experience).

Her roommate Hanna explained to me that a Dutch chef, who now has a restaurant in the city center, previously owned this kitchen. He told her when she bought the place that he actually loved the galley-sized kitchen in this flat and thought he could make it work for gourmet cooking.


The countertops are stainless steel and pair with sturdy white cabinetry and modern, streamlined hardware. There is an integrated dishwasher and refrigerator, as well as a pantry pullout. The five-burner gas oven and hood are both made by Bosch. Finally, the layout is simple and makes sense, with the refrigerator closest to the dining room and the sink near the stove. To top it all off, the kitchen is mostly lit by a large window that looks out into a small garden lined with lemon trees.

After an exhausting (and rather adrenaline-filled) day of bicycling through Amsterdam traffic, I humbly asked if I could cook us dinner in the kitchen. Thankfully they were more than happy to oblige, and the combination of the nearby market and the lovely kitchen made for a great dinner with friends.