KBB Collective | The Designers' Corner

May 23 2018

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Designing a New York City Kitchen

By Alice Tedesco

The world is getting bigger, but the interiors we live in are getting smaller. As interior designers, we have faced this fact often. With a small kitchen, the smokes and smells are free to go wherever they like. It is important to plan an efficient ventilation system where it’s possible to lead smoke and smells outside. It may not always be worth moving pipes to a more centered position, and the design may be compromised in a small space.

                                     Photo Courtesy of Cesar NYC

With a small kitchen and often open-plan kitchen, the mess in the space may be frequently visible. The mess factor should be a concern for any good designer, and we need to be able to work with clients and understand their daily flow of operations that can compromise the look of a kitchen. The kitchen’s functionalities need to be planned out to make day-to-day tasks as easy as possible. Ask plenty of questions, like where is the right place for the trash? Where is the right place for the fridge? You need to prioritize and give order to the kitchen.

My Example
I designed a new-build apartment in Midtown Manhattan, which was a tiny space of just 7-ft. by 7- ft. and was directly exposed to the living room. But there was no need to panic; you don’t need a lot of space, you just need a good design.

Small kitchens are always more complicated than big one – and making a small kitchen functional is a struggle – but I had a lot of fun with this project. We designed a space that allows my clients to both live in the kitchen and living room according to their tastes and attitudes. Whenever they want to have a romantic dinner or a party, their kitchen is the perfect solution.

                                       Photo Courtesy of Cesar NYC

We compromised on the size of the appliances to give them more storage, and we integrated all the functional appliances of the kitchen, including the preparation and food storage facilities. We made sure the kitchen has a great dialogue with the rest of the living space, thanks to the double height of the counter and a careful selection of colors and finishes.

                                     Photo Courtesy of Cesar NYC

The colors were selected accordingly with the main interior pallets to unify the space visually. The main material is a white elm melamine for the bottom units, and this runs from the bottom to the shelves dividing the space for functionality and merges the peninsula with the wall. In contrast, the upper cabinets are in acid-etched glass; this finish matches the back splashes and lifts up the space since the ceiling is just 7 feet. The material combinations and the paneled appliances are the strength of the project, with the layout hiding all the visible appliances inside the kitchen.

This kitchen looks way bigger than the 7-ft. by 7-ft. space in which it is located. It’s open, fresh, and the clients just love it!

                                 Photo Courtesy of Cesar NYC

This entry was posted on Wednesday, May 23rd, 2018 at 9:37 AM and is filed under Inspiration, Kitchen Design, Trends. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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