K+BB Collective | The Designers' Corner

Mar 20 2017

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Inside Magic


After attending the Architectural Digest Show this past week, I was invited to visit the brand new Häfele showroom in the Flatiron District of Manhattan. The showroom itself is a step up from their previous location near Central Park. Although the neighborhood is more out of the way, the expansive windows and the ability to be on one floor won the company over.

The hardware and lighting technology Häfele is known for is showcased around the showroom in two working kitchens, office spaces and in different kinds of sliding doors. One standout addition catching everyone’s eye is a series of remote-controlled sliding walls.

These four walls have product on both sides, so to save space the walls were put on tracks. This way they can open on demand, revealing a hallway in the middle for people to walk through. The three other walls, meanwhile, remain closed until needed. This saves space and introduces potential consumers to the high-tech nature of some of the company’s products.


Another major theme of the showroom is lighting. As Scott Kaminski, marketing and PR manager of Häfele introduced it, light can be considered a furniture piece. A placard in the showroom suggested the interaction of light in a room has an influence on well-being. Bright, cold light enhances alertness, while softer light sources enhance relaxation. LED technology within furniture brings in a whole other dimension to a design.


As designers, you know integrated lighting is essential for today’s kitchen and bath, but have clients recognized this? Unless the cabinet manufacturer explicitly includes special hardware – like swing-outs – do clients know they can make the interiors of their cabinets much more functional? One concern another designer brought up was that there is disconnect between hardware and cabinet manufacturers. Clients might assume their cabinetry comes with special interior hardware, but that is often not the case. In addition, designers have to educate themselves on how to bring the two together in a design.

What do you think? Have you been challenged by any disconnect between interior hardware and cabinetry? What are your favorite types of interior hardware to use? Let us know on our Facebook page, our Twitter @kbbconnect or on Instagram @KBB_magazine.

This entry was posted on Monday, March 20th, 2017 at 7:09 PM and is filed under Inspiration, Showrooms. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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